Mother died today, etc.

Dateline: Sun 29 Mar 2020

'My mother died today. Or maybe yesterday. I don't know.'

When I thought of that classic opening line from 'The Stranger' by Albert Camus a few days ago, it was because I was feeling what Mersault expressed. Isolated, detached, overwhelmed, with a callus over my heart.

If that's where you've been or are, so be it. 'There it is.'

Sometimes we need a callus just where the skin has been rubbed raw. We need to toughen to be able to continue functioning, using that thumb, walking on that heel. Sometimes we need to be hard in order to survive.

I saw my primary physician for a routine checkup about 6 months ago. We discussed, as we often do, the state of the world and faith (about half his kids are believers, he said). "I'm not sure that generation...has ever been tested," he said. That applies to most of us.

Americans have been the luckiest humans on the planet in the history of mankind. 

We've had our trials. But this is different.

I know because, like you, I am reading stories that have never before been written --

Jan. 27, Wall Street Journal, about the wet markets in China and the possible connection to those food sources and COVID-19.

Last Sunday in the Star, tracing the steps of Indiana's first victim, Roberta Shelton, pointing out that even after she became deathly ill, her multiple contacts were not notified by our departments of health.

And a column yesterday in WSJ by Robert Nicholson, "A Coronavirus Great Awakening?" which suggests that maybe, just maybe, the virus will lead to a "grand creative moment" in America's history, a rediscovery of God.

"Who will save us now that the monster has broken free?" Nicholson asks, remembering Joseph Conrad's reflection on nature -- we have reduced nature to 'the shackled form of a conquered monster.'

Nicholson reminds us that we are a spoiled people. We think we have the monsters at bay.

Historically, until the 1700s, most of the world lived in poverty. That was, if we survived being born and childhood. Life was indeed nasty, brutish and short.

Tragedy makes us helpless; helpless can lead to asking for help, to creativity, to a sense of our place in the grand scheme. It can lead to calluses.

Medically speaking, most calluses last only one to four weeks, and they fall off. Then something new grows in its place.

That may be next. 

Comments

Mike Widner [unverified] said:

So glad to see your return! Please keep writing!

2020-03-30 05:00:13

Dennisvog [unverified] said:

?? ?????????? ?????? ???????? ????? ???????????? ????????????? ????????????? ?????????????? ???? ???????, ??? ??? ???? ??? ??????? ???? ???????????? ???????????? ?????????? ?? ?????? ??????? ???????????. ???????? ???? ??????? ????? ??????? ?????????? ????????? ?? ????????????????? ?????????: ??????— ???????? ?????????? ?? ????? ?????? ????????????? ????, ?????? ??????????? ?????? ????? ???????????? ?? ????????? ?? ???? ????????? ?? ?????? ?????? ????????? ????? ???????.
????? — ????????? ???????????? ??????????? ? ????????? [url=http://chernozem.dostavka.biz.ua/contacts.html]????? ????????? ?????[/url] ??????????? ????????, ?????? ?????????? ?????????? ????????? ??????????? ????? ????? ???????????? ???????, ?? ??? ????????? ???????????? ????? ???????? ?? ????????????? ????????? ???????? ???? ?? ???????? ??????????. ???????? ????? ???????????? ??????? — ??????????? ????????? ??????????. ? ????? ????????? ??????? ????? ??? ??????????? ??????????? ??????????? ??????? ??????? ????? ?????? ????????? ????????????? ????, ?? ??? ? ???????? ???????????, ????? ??? ???????, ???????????? ????????????, ??????????? ????????? ???????????? ????? ?????????????, ?? ????? ???? ????????? ?????? ??????.

2020-03-30 13:56:16

Michael [unverified] said:

Nice Ruth. Thanks

2020-03-30 16:32:25

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