Education reform breakfast -- free

Dateline: Tue 18 Sep 2012

The following is from the Mind Trust, under the headline "Half of low-income students in the U.S. will not graduate high school."

The Mind Trust, of course, supports education reform, and so runs into all sorts of walls with some people who are loyal to traditional public school concepts.

Here's the drift:

"As statistics like that show, we have a long way to go to provide all students an excellent education. But across the nation, education innovators are pioneering bold ideas for how to change that.


"On Oct. 3, Indianapolis will have an opportunity to hear from one of them.


"Join UNCF, 100 Black Men of Indianapolis, La Plaza, Education Reform Now, Lacy Leadership Association, School Choice Indiana, the Indianapolis Urban League, Stand for Children and The Mind Trust for a discussion with nationally renowned education reformer Dr. Howard Fuller, who will share his ideas on how to improve our nation's K-12 education system. Fuller is one of the nation's most respected and thoughtful leaders in education today. His thought-provoking message has been aired in venues across the U.S., including in the critically acclaimed film, "Waiting for Superman." 


"The event will include a light breakfast and conversation about the future of public education in Indianapolis. 


Education today: Perspectives from one of the nation's leading reformers

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

8:00-9:30 AM

Madame Walker Theater

617 Indiana Ave. 

Indianapolis, IN 46202

Light breakfast and program


This event is free and open to the public but seating is limited -- reserve your spot today!


Questions? Contact Sarah Hawkins at  shawkins@themindtrust.org"


Comments

varangianguard [unverified] said:

For IPS, it may be too little, too late.
If the City turns enough urban area into TIF districts, IPS will be lose funding heavily at the local level. TIF monies could likely then go directly to funding alternatives to IPS instead, wholly at the Mayor's discretion.

2012-09-18 14:08:54

Boris [unverified] said:

"Reform" is one of the great masterstrokes that keeps the education establishment in business. The upshot of reform is always the same: a plea for more money.

As the great Richard Mitchell wrote:

The state of American government education is simply not a “problem” that can be solved. It is rather an enormous fact of life, a self-perpetuating institution elaborated from within by principle, not caprice, governed by collective assent, not individual talent. It easily absorbs the shock of every criticism by pretending to “reform” itself, only to transform and dilute whatever it claims to embrace into nothing but more of the same.

Plus Ça Change
http://tmh.floonet.net/books/academe/afterword.html

2012-09-18 16:52:54

hendy [Member] said:

The history of education is not so simple, and the "plus ca change" reference is a weasel's resignation.

Many responsibilities have changed; public education must now embrace all (which it should have done in the first place) and that's caused massive budget shifts to skew how money must be spent. Massive efforts to stanch property taxes (based on flipping houses and driving up values-- and proportionate taxes) has caused efforts to reformulate budgets. Anti-union criticisms and generous pensions in return for ridiculously low salaries (a huge cost that is a future annuity cost) have caused unfunded pension issues that politicians could avoid-- until the number became so huge that it was unavoidable.

Add in population shifts into have and have-not districts, massive meddling by civic politicians trying to do a school board's job, and it's a freaking mess.

The "great" Richard Mitchell's quote is clearly made of bull excrement, therefore, as it's it's a linear answer to a multi-dimensional problem.

2012-09-19 09:18:06

Whitebeard [unverified] said:

I have a loved one who is an inner-city public school teacher. She works, on average, about 80 hours a week - spending large segments of her weekends doing required reports, "paper work" etc. She works on vacations, holidays, etc. Many of the things she has to deal with in her job during the school week would be unfathomable for many people to comprehend. And she does this in a neighborhood where most suburbanites would not dare drive through even during daytime hours.

Here is my opinion (not argument): Anyone who is in a position to have an impact on changes in the educational processes should voluntarily spend at least two weeks as a un-assisted substitute teacher in an inner-city high school.

Then, and only then, will I give any credibility to their recommendations and plans for educational reform in this state.

Kids who don't care. Parents who don't care. "Privatizing" only serves to cherry-pick kids from public schools who do care about learning and whose parents do support them. And, it also sets up fertile ground for discovering new ways to cheat on standardized testing to prop up test scores so that the "education-for-profit" people can better sell The Product.

2012-09-19 15:30:52

Tell The Truth [Member] said:

Whitebeard, of course you're right. And here's another truism:

They get enough money. They just make poor chboices with the money they get.

I've been directly involved with or joined at the hip to, educational governance since the early 80s. Poorer, disadvantaged kids cost more. That's true. But when the top tier siphons off enough money to float the Morton-Finney Center, something's desperately wrong.

Administrators are entrenched or CYA-ing all the damned day long. Except for the folks who need to keep records, push every damned admin back into the buildings. And into classrooms wherever possible.

DOn't ever forget: the "teachers are bad" mantra doesn't help anyone. It'ws also largely untrue. And also don't forget; IF there's a bad teacher in a building, that teacher exists solely at the discretion of a principal. Who can, at the drop of a hat, begin (exhaustive) procedures to get rid of bad teachers.

Bottom line? Most admins won't invest the time to push the bad teachers out. They'd rather collect their six-figure salaries, shuttle the kids off buses, shuttle them between classes, feed them, shuttle some more, and put them back on buses. Rinse, repeat five times. Bingo-bango, one week gone.

Clean up these two fiefdoms and you make a huge difference:

1. Administrators: thin the herd and allow more private-sector folk to do the job; and
2. Lap-dog school board members. For the life of me I don't understand why they become enamored with Superintendents, but they do. Off with their heads.

After you lop off their heads, go to this breakfast. Or before. Doesn't really matter.

Oh yeah--buh-bye, Ms. Busch and Ms. Z. Good riddance. Don't let the door hit you. And shame on you for putting up with Superintendent incompetence so long.






2012-09-19 18:28:14

Tell The Truth [Member] said:

Whitebeard, of course you're right. And here's another truism:

They get enough money. They just make poor chboices with the money they get.

I've been directly involved with or joined at the hip to, educational governance since the early 80s. Poorer, disadvantaged kids cost more. That's true. But when the top tier siphons off enough money to float the Morton-Finney Center, something's desperately wrong.

Administrators are entrenched or CYA-ing all the damned day long. Except for the folks who need to keep records, push every damned admin back into the buildings. And into classrooms wherever possible.

DOn't ever forget: the "teachers are bad" mantra doesn't help anyone. It'ws also largely untrue. And also don't forget; IF there's a bad teacher in a building, that teacher exists solely at the discretion of a principal. Who can, at the drop of a hat, begin (exhaustive) procedures to get rid of bad teachers.

Bottom line? Most admins won't invest the time to push the bad teachers out. They'd rather collect their six-figure salaries, shuttle the kids off buses, shuttle them between classes, feed them, shuttle some more, and put them back on buses. Rinse, repeat five times. Bingo-bango, one week gone.

Clean up these two fiefdoms and you make a huge difference:

1. Administrators: thin the herd and allow more private-sector folk to do the job; and
2. Lap-dog school board members. For the life of me I don't understand why they become enamored with Superintendents, but they do. Off with their heads.

After you lop off their heads, go to this breakfast. Or before. Doesn't really matter.

Oh yeah--buh-bye, Ms. Busch and Ms. Z. Good riddance. Don't let the door hit you. And shame on you for putting up with Superintendent incompetence so long.






2012-09-19 18:28:19

Teacher [unverified] said:

IPS is specifically being attacked by conservative reform movement and for profit education system. This movement isn't attacking township schools, no charter schools in Washington township.

The Mind Trust is pushing conservative reform. School choice and neiborhood schools work great if you can either drive your children to a good school or live in a good neighborhood. Many poor families don't have that option. Don't kid yourselves this is all about segregation and the distruction of the public school system by attacking the largest systems first.

Take a look at the Mind Trust's website. There are only two educators on the board. Many of the staff have with strong ties to the Indy Chamber of Commerce.

If they really cared about school reform they would run for school boards and be held responsible for their decisions. The Mind Trust is in the business of propaganda.

2012-09-20 11:38:14

Teacher [unverified] said:

IPS is specifically being attacked by conservative reform movement and for profit education system. This movement isn't attacking township schools, no charter schools in Washington township.

The Mind Trust is pushing conservative reform. School choice and neiborhood schools work great if you can either drive your children to a good school or live in a good neighborhood. Many poor families don't have that option. Don't kid yourselves this is all about segregation and the distruction of the public school system by attacking the largest systems first.

Take a look at the Mind Trust's website. There are only two educators on the board. Many of the staff have with strong ties to the Indy Chamber of Commerce.

If they really cared about school reform they would run for school boards and be held responsible for their decisions. The Mind Trust is in the business of propaganda.

2012-09-20 11:38:17

Hah! [unverified] said:

Teacher's right. How could anyone in his right mind not admire the splendid blessing that IPS bestows on the lucky kids?

2012-09-22 17:42:20

Blonedreade [unverified] said:

http://efdsxxdced.com - EzRsCE , <a href=http://nnizftis.com>XGyWFrvemDpwW</a> - http://xupmysjcg.com

2012-09-23 12:10:08

Teacher [unverified] said:

"Hah" great job staying on script!

2012-09-23 22:58:38

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